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What My Author Blog is For

I’ve been remiss about posting to this site. I first started it in 2011 mainly because I read that all authors should have a web presence, which at the time meant a blog, Twitter, and Facebook. I had none of these, and I had no idea what to do with them once I did. I figured they were for promoting my books.

Unfortunately, I don’t like selling any more than I like being sold to, so I initially used my blog for reviews of other people’s books. That just never seemed right to me, though. As a writer, I felt uncomfortable reviewing the works of other writers on my web page. I no longer do it, except for an occasional review of a nonfiction book, and I’ll stop posting those here as well. There’s a better place for reviews, anyway: Goodreads, which recently notified me that I’m in the top 1% of reviewers. I assume that’s a good thing, although I have no idea how they determine the ranking.

I also tried dabbling with posts about what I was learning as an indie writer, but I was hardly qualified to do that, having not yet published much. That has changed. My next novel will be my eighth, but I still don’t feel comfortable giving advice. I’ve learned a few things, but I’m far from an expert, and none of my books has made anyone’s bestseller lists. The only claim to success I can make is that copies of my eBooks are downloaded almost every day now. Many of these are freebies. I haven’t seen many reviews, but the few that have been posted are predominately quite nice. All of my books are rated between 4 and 5 stars on both Amazon and Goodreads. If you wrote one of those reviews or simply posted a rating, thanks!

So I’m now effectively between books, with just a final check of The Brane of the Space Pirates needed before it’s released next month. (A paperback galley proof should be in the mail today.) I have only a very rough idea about the book I’ll be writing after that. I stare at the planning worksheet for it every morning, though, hoping a stray inspiration particle will strike me. In the meantime, this seems like a fine opportunity to revise my blogs.

I’ve already made a few small changes to this one, including some different headers and revised menus. In the future, I’ll be using this site as an open, online journal devoted to the types of things most people use their blogs for: writing about what they’ve been up to. In my case, that will probably mean short posts about reading and writing. I doubt anyone wants to read about my exciting adventures to the grocery store, my never-ending battle with slugs in my garden, what my pets have done, or about what I’m having for lunch…although apparently many people do write about that. Some even post pictures.

If I have a new book release, promotion, or something along those lines, the news will be posted on my publisher site, Fuzzy Android. I also have a site for nonfiction reviews, opinions, and observations, mainly about science, culture, philosophy, history…. If you like that kind of thing, check out The Avery Slom Philosophical Laboratory. It’s only been up a short time, but it already has a few followers.

For now, though, I need to stare at the worksheet for my next project a bit longer. I’m sure something will come to me.

The Stigma of Self Publishing – Et Tu Writers?

  I went to an Orlando Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers group meeting last night. It was our first get together in a few months because our organizer (Sarah Fisk) had to abdicate for job reasons and it took a while to replace her, although she has since moved back to Orlando and rejoined the group.

We held it at the food court of a local mall, an ideal place I thought because it easily accommodated our group without any expectation that we should be quiet or buy anything. Of the seven people at the table that night, one is a traditionally published author (Owl Goingback), one is a self published author (me), and the others are either writing speculative fiction books or have written some and are currently exploring their publication options.

Because we had a new organizer and a few new members, this was more of a chat session than our normal meetings, which focus on review and critique of members’ work. One topic that came up was self publishing. I suppose I was guilty of raising it because when publishing options came up, the implication seemed to be that the preferred option was traditional publishing. I wanted to point out that in the digital age there is another option and that it was my first option rather than a fallback position.

I was surprised that the other members seemed to either not consider this or thought of self publishing as the last, desperate act a writer would take and that books were only self published if they couldn’t meet the exacting standards necessary for traditional publication.

Obviously I don’t believe this to be true but the incredulous stares around the table made it clear just how pervasive this belief is, not just among readers, agents, and publishers, but among writers as well. Unfortunately this is not without cause.

Self publishing has some great advantages. For writers, these include retention of all rights to their work. They control everything from content to distribution. They control the cost of their books and they receive higher royalties as a percentage of sales.

For readers, self publishing means that there are more books in more subgenres than ever before. Books don’t need to fall into mainstream categories or follow whatever may be popular in their genre at the time in order to be published. A publisher’s impression of profitability does not enter into the equation. Self published books, especially ebooks, are almost always much cheaper than traditionally published books as well so readers have greater selection at lower cost. What could be better?

Well, there is the quality issue. The problem with anyone being able to publish is that anyone is able to publish anything. It doesn’t have to be good. It doesn’t even have to be coherent or readable or, in the case of nonfiction, even accurate. Now I won’t say this is an exclusive problem with self publishing because we have all seen traditionally published books that had these same flaws but if a major publisher’s logo was on the cover, a reader could be assured that it had at least gone through some editing process.

With self published books, there is no such guarantee and books can be released before they are ready. Some people, dishonest, scummy, and disreputable people who should be publicly flogged, tarred, feathered, and sent to their rooms without supper, have been known to scam this new openness by plagiarizing the work of others or intentionally throwing out dozens or even hundreds of short, poor quality books. There is currently no way to prevent this and it helps perpetuate the myth that all self published books are bad. I have seen other self published authors claim that readers can still tell quality books from reader reviews on sites such as Amazon. These certainly help and I don’t discount them but reviews and ‘likes’ are not necessarily a guarantee of quality either. Just as anyone can publish a book, anyone can write a review and writers can swap positive reviews and ‘likes’ with other authors as part of their promotion efforts, often with honest intent simply to help their peers.

There are a few disadvantages to self publishing for writers as well. They have to cover all of the up front costs themselves including editing, cover design, and formatting. Self published books are difficult to get into brick and mortar bookstores and the authors have to do all of their own marketing and promotion, which can be extremely difficult without the resources of an agent or traditional publisher to support them. Writers need to be willing to take on these challenges before they decide to self publish but their biggest hurdle may be the continuing stigma hovering over self published books.

I think there may be a fairly simple solution to this although it means readers will need to do a little research themselves. But since they are receiving the benefit of more options and lower costs, I don’t think this is asking too much. Actually my suggestion would apply to any author whose work you have not read before.

Before you decide to buy a book by an author unknown to you, read the sample pages first. If it still looks good, go to the author’s website. All legitimate self published authors should have one. There is probably even a link to it on the author’s page on Amazon or whatever online retailer sells their book. Look at the content. Keep in mind that self published authors may not be expert at web design but if the layout is logical and the content is good, chances are their books will be as well. If the book description looks like the type of book you would enjoy and the author’s website suggests that he or she is a competent writer, there is a good chance you’ve found something that will appeal to you. I know this is more work for readers but I think this inconvenience may be outweighed by the benefits readers receive in price and selection.

As always, if you have thoughts on this subject you would like to share, please leave a comment.

Related Posts:

My Self Publishing Adventure

My Self Publishing Adventure – Episode Five – Gaining a Following

   In February of 2011, I decided to turn my writing hobby into a vocation. In addition to spending time completing the two novels I had in draft, I joined a writers’ group, read several books on the craft of fiction writing, and I did some research on what publishing is like in the 21st Century and how it is changing. Based on what I had read and heard, I decided that rather than seeking a traditional path to publishing by querying agents and publishers, I would self publish my novels as e-books. The advantages seemed to outweigh the disadvantages although this puts extra responsibility on the writer. Whether this was a wise choice or not remains to be seen but one of the first things I learned was that I needed a “platform.”

Writing books is only part of a new writer’s job and, I have learned, not the most difficult part. The hardest part is letting people know they are available, attracting their attention and encouraging them to give them a try. This is where traditional publishing seems to excel but I felt confident that once people read my books, they would spread the word about them and want more. After all, my books are good. I know. I’ve read them and I have very discriminating taste.

But this strategy relies heavily on gaining those first readers, which means the author has to somehow accomplish four things:

  1. Attract readers’ attention.
  2. Get them to download the books.
  3. Persuade people to actually read them.
  4. Encourage them to write reviews and tell friends about the books.

I seem to be stuck at steps 1 and 2 right now. To attract attention, I started this blog and opened a Twitter account in May.

The blog has evolved since then. I began by writing short posts on some of the things that influenced my writing. Then I began sharing my experiences on writing and self publishing thinking these may be of interest to others who may be contemplating this path. Recently I’ve also been posting short reviews of books I just finished reading if they warrant four or five stars (on Amazon’s five star scale). Occasionally I also do a post on other topics as well. I try to do at least two posts a week. If I get comments on any of these, I try to respond.

The blog seems to be gradually attracting some following. These are the stats on the number of ‘hits’ it has received since it began.

  • May – 26
  • June – 42
  • July – 83
  • August – 96
  • September – 226
  • October – 308
  • November (so far) – 180

Twitter, the other major focus of my platform building effort, is less focused. I try to do at least ten tweets a day but these are fairly random, from clever quotes and quips to blatant self promotion of my blog or my books. As of today, I have 253 followers. I try to engage those I follow by retweeting tweets I find interesting or clever and I try to thank anyone who comments on mine or follows me.

So, has any of this turned into book sales? The short answer is, “No.” This table shows my book ‘sales’ to date.

 

 

 

 

By making a few assumptions, what I have leaned from this is that attracting attention, step 1 on my list, is difficult but not impossible. I have Twitter followers and people are visiting my blog and these numbers are gradually increasing.

Step 2, getting people to download my books can be done by offering them for free. My ‘beta’ version of the anthology Defying Fate came out in July and I offered it to friends and relatives for free. None had e-readers but some did download PDF versions from Smashwords and commented favorably. In September, I published the two books separately and offered the first for free on Smashwords for a month. During that time, 157 copies were downloaded. I then raised the price to 99¢ on Smashwords to match the price on Amazon. There were no sales after that on Smashwords.

Step 3, getting people to read them is where I’m stalled. I have no idea how many of those 157 free copies have actually been read but I have seen no comments or reviews on Smashwords as a result so I am assuming few, if any, have been. One five star review has been posted to Amazon though and I am extremely grateful for it. I am hoping it is the first of many.

I have learned that a low price by itself does not attract buyers. I thought it might but there are many books by new indie authors priced at 99¢ and mine are just two out of thousands. Because of comments I had received from other indie writers saying mine were priced too low for what they were, I had planned on raising the prices of my books this month but I am putting that off for now. Raising the prices, I fear, might make them less attractive and I’m really not in this to make money anyway. The main reason to charge anything at all is to give me a way to explain to others why I spend so much time with this.

My plan forward in addition to completing my third novel, is to try to attract more Twitter followers by targeting those I follow. I will also look into seeing if I can find book bloggers who may be interested in looking at my first book and doing a short review. If you are a book blogger or reviewer and would like a free copy in exchange for an honest review let me know.

For all of the other new writers out there, consider this encouragement not to give up. Once your first book is done and available, it is likely to take quite some time to get noticed. If you find yourself frustrated that it has not been, don’t be discouraged. You are not alone.

 Related Posts:
Why I Chose To Self Publish
My Self Publishing Adventure – Episode One
My Self Publishing Adventure – Episode Two
My Self Publishing Adventure – Episode Three – Building a Platform
My Self Publishing Adventure – Episode Four – Managing Expectations
Ten Things For Aspiring Fiction Writers To Consider

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